11 Sport & Social Inclusion – Shownotes

In this episode I speak to three fantastic organisations to find out how sport can help reduce social isolation and have a positive impact on people’s lives.

First of all I spoke to Steven McFadyen from Alzheimer’s Society about the new Dementia Friendly Sport & Physical Activity guide, and how it will support people living with dementia to become more active.

I then chatted to Claude Umuhire from The Running Charity about the huge impact the organisation has had on his life. Whilst homeless himself, Claude joined and graduated the programme, providing him with drive and confidence, and inspiring him to share his experiences with others by becoming Programmes Coach for the charity.

Finally I met Tom Browne from The BAT Foundation, who explained how table tennis therapy has helped people to get active, can reduce the onset of Alzheimer’s disease, and provide inclusive activity for people living in care homes.

The Alzheimer’s Society

  • Steve talks about The Alzheimer’s Society’s work with leisure centres, gyms & sports clubs to make them more dementia-friendly; with simple adaptations, accessibility and linking audiences with activities key to the success of the Dementia-Friendly Sport & Physical Activity Guide [1:52]

The Running Charity

  • Claude’s tells us his personal story and journey through the programme which powerfully highlights the impact that The Running Charity has had on his life, which as a programme leader at the charity he is now sharing with others. [12:42]
  • Claude explains his role as Programme Manager, the successes he’s had in supporting homeless people to get active and back into work and partners they’ve worked with [22:11]
  • We talk about future plans in the charity with exciting plans to grow to new cities and abroad, and how sport can help people that are experiencing social isolation [34:28]

Bounce Alzheimer’s Therapy (BAT) Foundation

  • Tom talks about how the BAT Foundation was created, the aims of the charity and how they are supporting people living with dementia to get active. [46:03]
  • Tom explains the charity’s “open arms” approach to partnerships, how they have provided equipment and training to care homes nationally, and future plans for the organisation. [57:23] 

Significant quotes:

“I actually think the social element of sport is arguably the most important bit, in terms of getting people out of their house, back into their communities and feeling valued, and being active member of their society. Confidence – one of the key reasons people living with dementia don’t leave their house is lack of confidence, and if they’re able to build that and be comfortable in certain environments reduces the risk of social isolation and loneliness.” [7:15]

“A month later I ran a Parkrun in 25 minutes. It was the first time since I became homeless I was able to not only plan for the future but also to implement smaller steps to help me get to my goal in the future which gave me an untold amount of confidence”. [15:43]

 “Other negative prejudgements of what homelessness is are false… all these young people needed, all I needed was for someone to give me a route, a way out. Once I saw it I took it and was able to better myself, and that’s the story of every young person that’s taken part in the programme.” [21:32]

“It’s environments that we are able to create when we set up a table at a care home or event – that’s what it’s all about. It’s not about if someone could hit a ball ten times, it’s that when they are with us, they feel on top of the world, they feel looked after and part of a community – that’s what sport can do and we need to build on that” [Tom]

Links Mentioned:

11 Sport & Social Inclusion

How can sport help to provide social inclusion?

In this episode I speak to three fantastic organisations to find out how sport can help reduce social isolation and have a positive impact on people’s lives.

First of all I spoke to Steve McFadyen from The Alzheimer’s Society about the recently published Dementia Friendly Sport & Physical Activity guide, and how it will support people living with dementia to become more active. 

I then chatted to Claude Umuhire from The Running Charity about the huge impact the organisation has had on his life. Whilst homeless himself, Claude joined and graduated the programme, providing him with drive and confidence, and inspiring him to share his experiences with others by becoming Programmes Coach for the charity. 

Finally I met Tom Browne from the Bounce Alzheimer’s Therapy Foundation, who explained how their adapted table tennis equipment and coaching has helped people to get active, can reduce the onset of Alzheimer’s disease, and provide inclusive activity for people living in care homes.

For full shownotes and links from the episode, please visit www.sportsinsiderpodcast.com

10 Women in Sport

How can sport get more women and girls active?

In this episode I spoke to women across the sports industry, both professionals and athletes, to find out what first brought them into sport and how they believe sport can get more women and girls active in the future.

First of all I spoke to Leigh Martin, London & South East Regional Team Leader at England Netball. She has played high level netball and basketball, coaches the sport and is currently studying a doctorate in Sport and Exercise Psychology. I found out –

  • Why is it a hugely exciting time for the sport this summer?
  • How are Back to Netball and Walking Netball getting more women active?
  • How does Leigh intend to help develop coaches in the future?

I then chatted to Jess Trimnell, club captain of AFC Wimbledon Ladies. The team currently competes in the FA Women’s National League Division One South East. Jess told me –

  • What was it like competing for GB in the World University Games in China in front of packed crowds?
  • How has Jess supported AFC Wimbledon to develop women’s and girls’ football in recent years?
  • How are the FA working to grow the sport?

For full shownotes and links from the episode, please visit www.sportsinsiderpodcast.com

10 Women in Sport – Shownotes

In this episode we talk to women across the sports industry, both players and professionals, to find out what first brought them into sport and to find out their views on how sport can get more women and girls active in the future.  

England Netball

Leigh Martin talks about her background in netball and basketball after being introduced by her family to sport at a young age and competing at a high level in Scotland. We talk about the highlights of her professional career in developing the sport and getting more women and girls taking part through programmes such as Walking Netball [1.42]

We talk about how the success of the national team has helped to drive more coverage of the sport and encouraged more participants at the recreational level and Leigh’s plans to help develop coaches through her studying of Sport and Exercise Psychology [10:30]

AFC Wimbledon Ladies

I talk to Jess Trimnell about how her season is going at AFC Wimbledon, how the club has developed in recent years under her captaincy, and her experience playing in front of capacity crowds at the World University Games in China [22:55]

We talk about the work that the FA and football more widely is doing to try and create more opportunities for women and girls to take part in the sport in the future such as through the Wildcats programme [34:14]

Significant quotes:

England Netball

“Netball is my main sport now, coaching and working with England Netball, I’m living and breathing netball all the time!” [5:07]

“I find once they’ve come through the door, and they see that we don’t care how well you do a chest pass, we just want you to get involved, have a good time and meet people. Once people have been to that first session and see that it’s friendly, and that coaches want them to have a good time, that gets them hooked and they become a regular fixture” [9:02]

AFC Wimbledon Ladies

“One of the reasons why I joined Wimbledon was to create more than just having a Ladies team. It was about having a whole club – Ladies, Development, Reserves, and the younger age groups underneath that, and hopefully be as good a role model as possible to girls that are aspiring to become an adult Ladies footballer” [25:05]

“You had your Olympic Village, and then the stadiums they’d built just for this [the Student Olympic Games] was insane! We were playing in front of around 30,000. For the match against China it was a sellout – to go out onto the pitch in front of that many people was phenomenal and something I’ll remember for a very long time” [27:02]

“With the [FA Women’s] Super League starting (Women’s Super League One and Superleague Two), there’s been a big drive with that. Netball have been similar with their Super League starting. It’s raising the profile at the higher end, that will attract people in at the lower end, and then we’ve got to provide it” [36:15]

Links Mentioned:

09 Football – Part 2

In part two I chatted to one of the youngest non-league football managers – Luke Smith, about how his kickboxing background led him into a coaching and managerial career at non-league football clubs. I found out –

  • How much commitment is required to become a successful football manager and coach?
  • How does Luke deal with challenges such as player confidence and availability?
  • How much pride does Luke take in seeing talented players progress within the game?

I then spoke to Matt Hudson, Media Manager at Colchester United FC, to find how he led the development of the media department at the club during a period of transition to a new stadium, whilst embracing new opportunities to engage fans. I discovered –

  • How has the football landscape changed during Matt’s time in the game?
  • How has the media department helped engage more fans with the club?
  • How did the media team contribute to winning Family Club of the Year in 2015?

For full shownotes and links from the episode, please visit www.sportsinsiderpodcast.com

09 Football – Part 2 – Shownotes

Welcome to Part 2 of the football episode, where I talk to professionals within football to find out more about their stories, their highlights and challenges they’ve overcome within the sport.

Show Notes:

Luke Smith

  • Find out how Luke’s disciplined background in kickboxing coaching led him to become a football manager. He later joins Rothwell Corinthians, working his way up to the managerial role, before becoming U21 manager at Kettering Town [1:31]
  • Luke talks about some of the highlights and challenges of coaching and management in non-league and provides advice for people that are interested in becoming professionals in football [11:05]

Matt Hudson

  • Matt talks about how the role of the media team has grown as the club has recognised that it is key to engage effectively with fans outside of match-days with an offer across a range of media channels [20:33]
  • Matt discusses how the club responded to the transition to the new stadium, how it has successfully attracted new fans to the ground and was able to win the EFL Family Club of the Year award [30:28]

Significant quotes:

Luke Smith

“How did that happen?! So you’ve got to the age of 23, and you’re a football manager… it sounds a bit bizarre really!” [1:35]

“I went in there with that kickboxing mindset – I’m in charge, this is what’s happening, if you don’t like it, do some press-ups or go home, and it gradually built from there.” [3:46]

“The Kettering U21s had a brilliant side… a lot of them are playing semi-professional football, and a lot of lads from Burton Albion are now playing at a good level” [15:37]

Matt Hudson

“I came in and took over the website in the second half of my first season, then the programme in the following season, and it’s all evolved from there… when you look back, there was no Facebook, Twitter, Youtube or email marketing, so each year as the opportunities grown, so has the responsibility [26:07]

“Our priorities are – how can we best to use our time to share the club’s story and attract people to games – we’re getting there, crowds are only steadily heading in the right direction and probably needs on-pitch success to supplement this as well” [27:00]

“We sat down and thought what we can do that’ll make us stand out and how will we go about it. Before the first game, 3 or 4 of us were up ladders painting the concourses with paint kindly donated by local businesses. Our unique selling point was that the staff that really believed in the football club and wanted to make it a special experience for people.” [33.07]

Links Mentioned:

09 Football – Part 1 Shownotes

Show Notes:

  • Cody talks about his early career in non-league football, where a move to Dartford resulted in a great run of goals and his trial at Norwich City. Cody talks about his trial and early days at the club, including a dream goal on debut against Cardiff, and promotion in Cody’s first full season [4:37]
  • Cody ‘s move to Gillingham resulted in a fantastic season where he scored 25 goals. After a more challenging time at Coventry City with injuries and difficulties at the club off the pitch, Cody returned for a successful second spell on a permanent basis at Gillingham FC [17:37]
  • Cody reflects upon the highs and lows of his career in football, revealing how he coped with the pressure of playing in front of crowds and the scrutiny of the media [26:18]

Significant quotes:

[On signing for Norwich] “I didn’t really get the chance to think about if it would or wouldn’t happen… before I knew it I was a Norwich player – it was a really crazy time!” [5:30]

“[Debut goal for Norwich City] It was a midweek game against Cardiff, and I came on for the last fifteen minutes… after five minutes I scored… it topped off the mental few months I’d had!” [10:20]

“[On playing in goal for Norwich City] When you look back on it now it’s funny… but at the time, it was live on Sky. I thought I’ve played in goal before… so I went in goal and I thought “Oh no, what am I doing?!” [16:53]

“[First season at Gillingham] Everything went smoothly… I played every minute of every game, it was a real free-flowing season, you feel like every time you get a good chance you’re going to take it” [18:14]

09 Football – Part 1 – Cody McDonald

What is it really like working and playing in professional football?

In this episode I talk to professionals within football to find out more about their stories, their highlights and challenges they’ve overcome within the sport.

In part one I spoke to professional footballer Cody McDonald, who has played as a striker for the likes of Norwich City, AFC Wimbledon and Gillingham. Cody is currently at Ebbsfleet United and still scoring regularly. He talks with great honesty about his career and I asked him –

  • What was it like moving to Norwich City FC and scoring on debut?
  • What were the challenges of becoming a professional footballer?
  • How did he succeed at Gillingham FC?

For full shownotes and links from the episode, please visit www.sportsinsiderpodcast.com

08 Park & Urban Sport – Part 2 – Shownotes

Welcome to Part 2 of this episode about urban sport and recreation in parks, and how they’ve grown in recent years.

First of all, I spoke to Ross Cawood, Franchise Owner of London & NZ Last Man Stands Leagues, to find out more about the successful evening cricket leagues that they provide. LMS was formed in 2005 and has become the widest reaching amateur cricket league in the world.

I then speak to Luke Thompson, GB Goalball Captain, about the rapidly growing sport of Wallball. Luke competes around Europe within the sport, having developed his skills by playing Rugby Fives and is supporting UK Wallball to introduce the sport to more schools and urban areas in the future.

Show Notes:

Last Man Stands

Ross talks about the success of LMS and how its accessible, quick format has grown cricket in parks, how they’ve worked around busy lifestyles, and how technology helps to engage with participants [1:10]

We talk about the balance between the social and competitive elements of sport and how LMS provides for both, with rules that encourage everyone to have an opportunity to participate fully [7:40]

Wallball

Luke explains how he first started playing Wallball, what the sport is and how the accessibility of the sport lends itself to urban environments [12:40]

Luke talks about how his recent success in European competitions, and UK Wallball’s plans for the sport to grow within schools and urban sites within London and across the country [17:30]

Significant quotes:

LMS

“The glue to it all is having global stats and rankings; wherever you play in the world, you can rank yourself against everyone else” [1:22]

“We identified parks not being used for cricket. For the councils and local authorities, they now see well-structured leagues, they don’t have to do a lot of work other than maintaining grounds – we do it all for them.” [4:17}

“We recently had our World Series (our World Cup) with the best players from around the world playing with each other. Our plans are to be innovative and keep improving the stats. When leagues run well, it is a fantastic product” [9:35]

Wallball

“Wallball is very much a street sport. Out in New York, in the hardest areas such as the Bronx, you get wallball courts and the community comes together to play” [14:05]

“Wallball just needs a ball and a wall somewhere, you can practice on your own, play with some mates – it’s incredibly accessible for urban environments” [15:43]

“I’m up to 3rd in Europe on the singles front, which has been a long time coming, with lots of tournaments and travelling. With my doubles partner Dan Grant, we are just starting to take control of Europe! We won the Spanish Open this year and two weeks ago we won the Dutch Open” [18:08]

Links Mentioned:

Last Man Stands

Register as an individual or a team – www.lastmanstands.com/join

UK Wallball

UK Wallball – https://ukwallball.co.uk/

Facebook / Instagram

Westway Centre – 8pm – 10pm Tuesday evenings  – https://www.everyoneactive.com/centre/westway-sports-fitness-centre/

08 Park & Urban Sport – Part 2

Welcome to Part 2 of this episode about urban sport and recreation in parks. I had a great chat with two successful organisations that have grown activity within parks and urban areas in recent years.

First of all I spoke to Ross Cawood, Franchise Owner of London & NZ Last Man Stands Leagues, to find out –

  • How have they managed to grow evening cricket leagues globally?
  • How have they made their leagues work around busy lifestyles?
  • How have used technology to engage with their players and teams?

I then talked to Luke Thompson, GB Goalball Captain and coach at UK Wallball, who explained –

  • What makes Wallball the perfect sport for urban areas?
  • How have Luke’s recent competitions progressed as he competes at the top end of the sport?
  • What plans do UK Wallball have to grow the sport in the next few years?

For full shownotes and links from the episode, please visit www.sportsinsiderpodcast.com